CREATIVE SHORT COURSES

Creative short courses take place one evening a week and are ideal for industry professionals seeking to extend their knowledge/skills and also for individuals who are simply interested in learning about a specific area of art and design.

Drawing Techniques & Approaches
Computer Applications in Art & Design
Web Design
Digital Photography

Drawing Techniques & Approaches

Content 

In this unit students will be encouraged to develop visual thinking and creativity as fundamental to all design work. It will enable learners to experiment with drawing approaches and techniques in order to broaden their experience and understanding of visual language. Learners will need to use materials and media which are specific to design, as well as unusual materials and media which will extend their visual language and creativity.

Aims

  • Encourage students to develop visual thinking and creativity as fundamental to all art, design or craft work.
  • To enable students to experiment with drawing approaches and techniques in order to broaden their experience and understanding of visual language.
  • Introduce students to a variety of materials and media which are specific to art, craft and design, as well as unusual materials and media which may extend visual language and creativity.

Teaching & Learning Strategy

Students will be exposed to a wide a range of good-quality examples. In particular the study of visual language in relation to different cultural contexts will be wide ranging, with a particular focus on mark-making techniques, formal elements, and responses, moods and emotions evoked.

Students are encouraged to look at contemporary youth culture as well as historic sources for reference.

Students will evaluate their own use of visual language. Unusual materials and media which may extend visual thinking and creativity, as well as materials and media which are specific to art, craft and design, will be used.

Students will be asked to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding through discussion, presentation, criticism with tutors, professional practitioners and peer group. Discussion and criticism will be constructive and will build on the student’s skills and potential. Formal elements and visual dynamics are essential parts of the vocabulary for all artists, craftspeople and designers. These technical terms will be used in discussion with students about art, craft and design work. Research is a basic skill that is developed through this unit in order to broaden visual thinking and creativity in art, craft and design. Students will be encouraged to research others’ work and critically analyse their use of materials and media, techniques and processes to improve the quality of their own work.

Assessment

Evidence for this module can be generated through exploratory work using the formal elements of 2D visual language and mark-making techniques. Work produced should effectively communicate a theme and evoke responses from the viewer.

Students can present analysis and evaluation of their own and others’ work in written assignments or to peer groups and/or tutors for discussion. Students should be able to articulate their own thinking using appropriate language, through discussion and evaluation, demonstrating a broader understanding of visual thinking and creativity in their work.

Students will present a juxtaposition of concepts, subjects, techniques and materials through a range of work that shows originality and innovation.

Computer Applications in Art & Design

Content

The aim of this unit is to introduce students to the creative potential of the computer in the context of 2D design. It will provide the opportunity to explore software and its relevance to the area of study. It aims to provide an overview of a variety of painting, drawing, typographic and desktop publishing software. It encourages combinations of traditional and digital design practices, leading to innovative presentations.

Module Aims

  • To introduce students to the creative potential of the computer in the context of 2D art, craft and design.
  • Provide students with the opportunity to explore software and its relevance to their own area of study. It aims to provide an overview of a variety of painting, drawing, typographic and desk-top publishing software.
  • Encourage the combination of traditional and digital art and design practices, leading to innovative presentations.

Teaching & Learning Strategy

An active experimental approach is practiced to encourage students to broaden their creativity. Demonstrations of software applications, research methods and health and safety practices are used as an introduction to the unit.

Research is a basic skill that is developed through this unit in order to broaden their creative reference points. Students should record sources carefully and accurately citing authors, titles of books, articles, journals and publications, date of publication, place of publication and country of publication.

There are a wide range of digital input and output devices. Students are encouraged to research beyond art and design applications to gain a broader view of computer use.

Students are also encouraged to combine traditional studio practice with digital technologies. The aim is to open up barriers which may exist between art, craft and design students and these new technologies.

Assessment

The following examples of evidence are suggestions. This unit offers an opportunity for experimentation with rastor/vector and bitmap graphics. Evidence for this might be a range of work produced using a painting application and a range of work produced using a drawing program. File size and format should be considered, particularly if the files are to be developed further. The focus of this unit is on 2D applications and encourages learners to look at the interrelationships between typography, design and image. Outcome 3 enables students to assemble and produce a desktop-published document using the new skills acquired from outcomes 1 and 2 Evidence for this might be an artefact like a newsletter or an innovative curriculum vitae.

Web Design

Content

This programme will enable students to produce interactive web pages that have multimedia content. The unit will cover the creation of HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) code through to the inclusion of Java applets to enhance web page design and production.

Module Aims

This unit enables students to create and manage web-based applications. The focus is on the server and the mechanisms to link web pages to databases.

Teaching & Learning Strategy

This unit can be delivered stand-alone if students have some prior programming experience. The delivery will be mainly practical and both simple and complex web specifications will be used. The students will be expected to be involved in managing associated servers. In addition to the technical aspects, students will be guided in ensuring that the web pages they produce are ‘user friendly’.

Assessment

This module allows the student to develop a web page, using a variety of methods. Students are expected to enhance the page and publish the completed pages on the web. This is a practical unit and the learners will be expected to work independently. Students will need to display organisation and management skills of relevant files in order to create a project with all necessary and appropriate application with interesting and creative design layouts. In the second part of the programme, one final assignment will also be required to be presented creating ML web pages, a text editor and using all relevant software tools.

Digital Photography

Content

This module instructs the fundamental principles that support digital photographic technologies used in professional practice. Students will gain a thorough practical and theoretical knowledge of a range of applications of digital photographic techniques. Lectures supported by seminars will facilitate an understanding of how digital technology has informed professional and fine art photography through the debate of leading practitioners and theoretical concerns.

Teaching & Learning Strategy

Students will process their own images digitally, and digital photography skills may be used to complement skills developed in other units. A series of integrated activities, which focus upon digital photography, can be used to generate evidence. Students should capture, save and store images appropriately. Written evidence to demonstrate understanding of the devices and techniques will also be prepared. Outcomes will be evidenced through image production and should focus upon the critical evaluation of students’ own work and relevant contemporary images. In addition, written work should indicate the students’ understanding of digital systems, copyright and the legal and ethical implications of digitally manipulating images.

Assessment activities involve peer group and/or tutor presentation and discussion. A major proportion of this programme is practice-based so students must demonstrate competent use of digital imaging systems in the production of practical work. Thus documentary evidence will include images, their evaluation and supporting written material demonstrating knowledge and understanding.

Module Aims

  • This unit is designed to enable students to develop and explore their digital image processing skills, together with their knowledge of the associated technology and systems.
  • The unit involves image capture, using digital cameras and scanning equipment, and image processing, of which image manipulation is a part.
  • Image storage and output will also form elements of this unit.
  • This unit is investigative and will enable students to develop their knowledge and skills to facilitate their specialisation in digital image production.

Assessment

Assessment is based on three or more practical projects that are designed to enable the student to develop their skills in a progressive manner. Skills and creativity are assessed via the practical projects 1 and 2, using the group critique as the principal activity for presentation, discussion and criticism of the students’ work as a creative visual form. Formative feedback is given in group critiques and individual tutorials. Summative feedback is given in individual tutorials.